Ducks

From WNY Wildlife Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

BIRDS



Birds of Prey
EaglesFalconsHawksOspreyOwls


Waterfowl
DucksGeeseSwans


Edge-Water Birds
BitternsCranesEgretsHerons


Galliforms
GrousePheasantsTurkeys


Corvids
CrowsJays


Other Birds
BlackbirdsCardinalsChickadeesCormorantsCreepersCuckoosDovesFinchesGrebesGrosbeaksGullsHummingbirdsKingfisherKingletsLarksLoonsNight JarsNuthatchesOriolesPhalaropesPigeonsPipitsPloversRailsSandpipersShrikeSparrowsStarlingsSwiftsSwallowsTernsTanagersThrashersThrushesTitmiceTowheesTyrant FlycatchersWarblersWaxwingsWoodpeckersWrensVireoVultures

Ducks are Waterfowl, along with Geese, Swans, and others.
NOTE: Initial Descriptions in this section were taken from [Merlin]. They will be modified to reflect and include local information.

Wood Duck

(Aix sponsa) Breeding males are stunning with ornate, colorful patterns visible up close; appears dark overall at a distance. Females gray-brown with thin white eyering. Crest on head. Found in wetlands and flooded woods. Flies through trees with exceptional maneuverability, thanks to its long tail. Often shy and quick to flush. Call is a loud, screeching whistle.

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) - © Ken Czworka

American Black Duck

(Anas rubripes) Nearly identical to Mallard in size and shape. Chocolate body is significantly darker than female Mallard. They dabble at the water's surface and tip-up at edges of wetlands to feed on aquatic plants and invertebrates. Can gather in large flocks in saltmarshes and other tidal areas.

Mallard Duck

(Anas platyrhynchos) The quintessential duck within most of its range, found anywhere with water, including city parks, backyard creeks, and various wetland habitats. Males have a green head, chestnut breast, and gray body. Females are mottled brown with orange and black splotches on the bill. White wingbars on the front and trailing sides of the blue wing patch are bolder compared to those on American Black Duck and Mottled Duck.

Mallard Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) ♂(r.)/♀(l.) - © David Malak

Canvasback

(Aythya valisineria)

Attractive duck with distinctive triangular head; forehead slopes seamlessly into the long bill. Males are white-bodied with black chest, reddish-brown head, and red eye. Females are dull grayish-brown with unique head profile and dark brown eye. Breeds in lakes and marshes. Winters in any large body of water with submerged aquatic vegetation on which to feed. Dives frequently, searching for vegetation and invertebrates. Often gathers in large flocks in nonbreeding season.

Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) - © Ken Czworka

Redhead

(Aythya americana) This attractive diving duck often gathers by the thousands on lakes or bays in the winter. Dives to reach submerged aquatic vegetation. Nests on marshy freshwater ponds and lakes. Slightly smaller than a Mallard with rounded, puffy head. Males have reddish-brown head, straw-yellow eye, and gray body. Females are plain brown overall; a lighter blonde color than scaup and Ring-necked Duck. Best separated from Canvasback by rounded head and the male's darker gray body. About the size of Greater Scaup, but slightly larger than Lesser Scaup and Ring-necked Duck—this can be helpful when they are together in mixed flocks.

Redhead (Aythya americana) - © Ken Czworka

Ring-Necked Duck

(Aythya collaris) Diving duck that favors small bodies of water, such as beaver ponds and cattail marshes. Males are handsome with glossy black head and back; clean gray sides. Females are gray-brown, often with a pale area behind the bill and white eyering. Both sexes have a white band across the top of pale blue bill.

Ring-Necked Duck (Aythya collaris) - © David Malak

Greater Scaup

(Aythya marila) This attractive diving duck often gathers by the thousands on lakes or bays in the winter. Dives to reach submerged aquatic vegetation. Nests on marshy freshwater ponds and lakes. Slightly smaller than a Mallard with rounded, puffy head. Males have reddish-brown head, straw-yellow eye, and gray body. Females are plain brown overall; a lighter blonde color than scaup and Ring-necked Duck. Best separated from Canvasback by rounded head and the male's darker gray body. About the size of Greater Scaup, but slightly larger than Lesser Scaup and Ring-necked Duck—this can be helpful when they are together in mixed flocks.

Lesser Scaup

(Aythya affinis) Medium-sized duck, dives for invertebrates. Often in flocks and pairs on variety of water bodies. Head shape is best way to separate from nearly identical Greater Scaup; note peak near rear of crown. Also similar to Ring-necked Duck but grayer back and whiter flanks. Breeding males have dark head with green or purple sheen and bright white sides with some faint barring. Females are darker brown than Ring-necked Duck

Long-Tailed Duck

(Clangula hyemalis) Diving duck that favors saltwater in winter and Arctic tundra pools in summer. Males are distinctive with black, white, gray, and brown patterns and long pointed tail. Male plumage changes dramatically from winter to summer. Females and immature males are brownish overall with whiter face and large dark cheek patch. Dives frequently to feed mainly on invertebrates.


Long-Tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) - © David Malak

Ruddy Duck

(Oxyura jamaicensis) Small, compact duck with a long, fan-shaped tail, often held sticking up out of water. Breeding males have a chestnut body, black cap, white cheek, and baby-blue bill. Winter males have a brown body, black cap and white cheek. Females and immature males are brown overall with a dark cap and dark line through the cheek. Often in tight groups bobbing like corks on ponds and bays. Dives to forage on aquatic invertebrates. Not often seen flying.

Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis) - © Ken Czworka